Do Home Workouts Build Muscle?

Do Home Workouts Build Muscle?

I was very worried about how I would keep in shape without access to my normal workout equipment once the COVID-19 pandemic struck and the gyms closed. I found myself asking myself, “do home workouts build muscle?” When it came to working out without a treadmill or free weights, I didn’t know heads from tails. For the internet, thank goodness. 

Now I’ve noticed I’m really enjoying my new workout routine after several months of working out at home. So much so that I’m not sure that once this pandemic is over, I’ll go back to the gym as much as I used to. But because my new routine doesn’t look like my old routine, I was always a little suspicious. Are the exercises that I can do at home always as good as the ones I used to do in the gym? 

How many pushups are you capable of doing? If you haven’t done one in a while, it could be much harder to string even just five pushups together than you recall. How much muscle it takes to lift your body is shocking. It’s pretty easy to see that your body weight is a perfectly good replacement for those weights you used to add to the bar at your bench press after struggling through a few pushups.

There are hundreds of different exercises for body weight, which means plenty of variety and plenty of ways to hit just about every muscle group in your body. It’s as simple as choosing five or six different body-weight exercises to do a full-body workout, doing each one for at least 30 seconds, and then repeating the exercise circuit a couple more times. Whether you’re new to body-weight exercises or have restrictions on exercise, adjusting the exercise is good. That could mean pushups on your knees, burpees without jumps, or even jumping jacks without jumps. 

Body-weight workouts have something for everyone, regardless of whether you consider an efficient routine one that helps you lose weight, strengthen your muscles or just maintain a balanced lifestyle. And the best part is that they are available, costing just your time, which you wanted to spend anyway on working out. 

Home Workouts
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To keep your cardiovascular system in check you only need to shift your body to lift your heart to sustain cardiovascular activity, whether it’s through a stroll, jog, and bike ride, as allowed under the new government instructions, or walking up and down the stairs. 

It needs the most thinking to duplicate the resistance training outside the gym, and so is often the most overlooked one,’ he says, adding that resistance helps improve everything from hormonal wellbeing, bone density, and mobility to reduce the chance of injury and decrease back pains. 

Of course, a downside of home training is that you might not be able to live as heavy loads as you might do on the gym floor, it may be more difficult to raise strength. Consistent home bodyweight or resistance training will also help you maintain stamina, movement consistency, aerobic ability, and acquisition of skills just as well as going to the gym.

Your at-home exercises will feel like they are getting easier over time, just like they do in the gym or in a fitness class. But even at home, there is always a way to make every workout more challenging. Salinas suggests trying one or more of the following in order to kick your at-home workouts up a notch: 

  • Add more workouts or rounds to your routine, or restrict rest time between workouts 
  • Try beating the times or reps of last week’s 
  • Attach bands of resistance, dumbbells, or kettlebells

Here are some good workouts you can try at home:

Push

A surprisingly sophisticated movement to do well is the classic push-up. But by putting your hands on a chair or stool to effectively pull the floor closer to you, you can reverse this. Or if you’re advanced, you can make it happen by putting your feet on the chair to move the floor further away. Perform 3 8-10 rep sets.

Pull

This is the one most overlooked in-home workouts, as without equipment it’s the toughest to do. By looping a bath towel around the top corner of a door and using this as an anchor point to execute a row, the best way I have found with customers is to improvise a TRX. Perform 4 8-10 rep sets.’

Squat

A simple one to reproduce, as every time we stand up from a chair, we do this. For a beginner, without using our hands, we can easily do this by sitting and standing on a dining chair. Take the chair away for the more experienced ones and keep some kind of load in front of you. Perform 3 6-8 rep sets.

Hinge

This is the word we use to describe any sort of a deadlift by fitness folks. But bending down to lift a large object from the floor is what we say. Although barbells and dumbbells are built for this, any item at home can really be used. Perform 4 8-10 rep sets.

Lunge

We use this word to describe something on one leg, so it is a good place to start with a split squat (sometimes called a “static lunge”). Lunge forward and finally lateral (sideways) before progressing on to reserve lunges. On each knee, perform 3 sets of 8-10.

Conclusion

Answering the question, do home workouts build muscle, is complex. However, it’s important to know, whatever raises the heart rate, whether it’s a long stroll around the neighborhood or a sweaty strength-training session, is considered a good workout.

Written By Anthony Hylton

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