Different Types of Pliers

Different Types of Pliers 

Different types of pliers are used to grab, position, tighten, loosen, and cut metal parts. When choosing a pair of pliers, one should always evaluate the handle material, how tight the hinge will feel, how precisely the cutting surface will take place, and the overall quality of the instrument. 

Split Joint Pliers

Split Joint Pliers

Slip joints inspired the name of slip joint pliers. These are the pliers with an adjustable pivot point that allows the two components of the plier to move while also extending the range of the jaws. These pliers are capable of holding materials of varied thicknesses.

These are some of the more all-purpose pliers that are commonly seen in toolboxes. They are helpful for bending and holding, crimping metal, looping wire, and cutting wire and soft nails.

The jaws of the slip joint are divided into two sections, the first near the mouth, which features flat jaws with serrated roughness for better grasping on flat surfaces. The other jaws are found with a bend-out in order to hold rounded objects such as pipes and rods.

Water-Pump Pliers 

Water-Pump Pliers 

Tongue-and-groove pliers are pliers that function on the same principles as slip joints, allowing them to be considered a subset of that category rather than an altogether independent one. These pliers are also known as water-pump pliers, multi-grips, or channel-locks. These are the pliers that are most commonly used in plumbing applications.

The best thing about these pliers is that they feature an adjustable pivot that can change much more than the pivot of a slip joint. The water-pump pliers typically have seven distinct settings, however, this might vary depending on the size. The jaws remain parallel in every position but can expand significantly wider. To facilitate access to pipes in confined locations, the head is usually slanted and the grips are longer.

Locking Pliers

Locking Pliers

These pliers have the double motion that allows them to operate as a hand-held vise and are also known as Vise-Grips. The jaws of such pliers close as anticipated from any other set of pliers, with the extra benefit of locking it down with more pressure. When the lever on the handle is pressed, the locking pliers release their grip. By turning the screwdriver at the end of the handle, you may modify the jaw width.

Locking pliers can be used in a variety of situations, including those where pipe wrenches, adjustable wrenches, and clamps would normally be used.

Linesman’s Pliers 

Linesman’s Pliers 

Linesman’s pliers are sometimes known as electrician’s pliers because they feature a hinge at a fixed pivot point. The jaws of these pliers have a flat front with shallow serrations for flat grasping things, allowing electricians to twist cables together as needed. These pliers have side cutters that are located just behind the front of the jaws and are responsible for cutting the wires.

Despite the fact that they often have a variety of dipped handles and that most of them are insulated, they should not be used on live connections.

Cutting Pliers

Cutting Pliers

Cutting pliers, also known as diagonal cutting pliers, are an essential part of every electrician’s toolkit. These features are relatively short jaws that set up a certain angle away from the handles. The cutting knives are expanded to the tips, allowing you to precisely snip cables in a congested gang box or even cut tiny nails and screws. Aside from that, there are certain characteristics that offer it a longer grip for added leverage.

Wire Strippers 

Wire Strippers 

Moving on from the fundamentals, wire strippers and crimpers are the most typical candidates for an electrician’s toolbox. Several businesses take the basic flat steel construction and develop a more durable design in the form of needle nose pliers.

Additional features include screw shears, being able to slide the crimper between the handles rather than the jaw tip, a blunt tip to grip, twist, and pull wire, and wire benders. These are popular because they can often accomplish all of their functions as well as separate tools.

Needle Nose Pliers

Needle Nose Pliers

Needle nose pliers have a longer jaw that narrows to a point. These pliers are ideal for more delicate activities or chores that must be completed in a limited amount of area. Bending wires, holding fittings, putting fasteners, and even cutting are all handled successfully by needle nose pliers, which perform a lot of work and are the most heavily loaded pliers of all.

The jaws have a knurled surface and side cutters. There are numerous types with their tips bent at an angle ranging from 45° to 90° in order to provide simple access in tricky areas.

Different Types of Pliers: Conclusion

Before purchasing any pliers, make sure to test them out first. Buying them as a set, like many other tiny hand tools, might be an excellent way to get started. You will have a lot more enjoyable experience if you use the proper set of pliers for the job.

Written By: Jessica Santos

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